The histroy of Liverpool
Liverpool City of Culture 2008
Home page of the city portal Liverpool The attractions of Liverpool City Events on in Liverpool The history of Liverpool The Beatles A gallery of Liverpoll photographs
History of Liverpool
Speak Scouse
Liverpool Demographics
Famous Liverpudlians
Liverpools Attractions
Liverpool Cathedrals
Liverpool Capital of Culture
Liverpool Ghosts
Books on the History of Liverpool
 
 
Dioese of Liverpool - Parishes
Liverpool Skyline
PortCities Liverpool
Wikipedia Encyclopedia
 
 
 
 
 
Liverpool Skyline
 
 
 
 
 
 
Liverpool Albert Dock
 
 
 
 
 
Three Graces Liverpool
 
 
 
 
 
 

This page contains text from Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia.
Click Here to see original article.

Articles identified as from Wikipedia are identified as articles licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License, which means that it can be be copied and modified as long as the entire work ( including additions ) remains under this license.
See Copyright conditions.

From early humble origins Liverpool, as grown and developed to become one of the most famous cities to visit in United Kingdom. Liverpool, rich though it is in cultural history, architecture and for the many entertainers it has produced. Liverpool is very much a city of the 21st-century and the John Lennon Aiport, named for one of Liverpool's most famous sons, to-day, welcomes visitors from every corner of the globe.

Liverpool has a colorful history:

In 1190 the place was known as 'Liuerpul', meaning a pool or creek with muddy water. Other origins of the name have been suggested, including 'elverpool', a reference to the large number of eels in the Mersey.

The long history of this great city stretches back in time to the 1st-century A.D. when a settlement first appeared on the bank of the Mersey. This had grown into a thriving fishing village by the year 1200 and a charter when letters patent were issued by King John advertising the establishment of a new borough at Liverpool, and inviting settlers to come and take up holdings there. It is thought that the king wanted a port in the district that was free from the control of the earl of Chester. Initially it served as a dispatch point for troops sent to Ireland, soon after Liverpool Castle was built, which was removed in 1726. For four centuries, Liverpool was relatively unimportant. In the middle of the 16th century the population of Liverpool was only around 500, and the port was regarded as subordinate to Chester until the 1650s. A number of battles for the town were waged during the English Civil War, including an eighteen-day siege in 1644.

Liverpool, from this time till the end of the next century, the 1700's, made but a slow progress either in the extent of its trade or in the number of its inhabitants; nor is there any remarkable occurrence recorded of it, except the siege of it by Prince Rupert, in the English Civil Wars in 1644; some traces of which were discovered when the foundation of the Liverpool Infirmary was sunk, particularly the marks of the trenches thrown up by the prince, and some cartouches, etc., left behind by the besiegers.

In 1699 Liverpool was made a parish on its own by Act of Parliament, separate from that of Walton-on-the-Hill, with two parish churches. From that time may be traced the rapid progress of population and commerce, until Liverpool had become the second metropolis of Great Britain.

In the 18th century, as trade from the West Indies was added to that of Ireland and Europe, Liverpool began to grow. The first wet dock in Britain was built in Liverpool in 1715. Substantial profits from the slave trade helped the town grow and prosper. Liverpool's Black community dates from this period and grew rapidly, reaching a population of 10,000 within five years. By the beginning of the 19th century, 40% of the world's trade was passing through the docks at Liverpool.

The Liverpool of to-day owes much to the construction in 1846 of the "Albert Dock" a stunning architectural triumph, and the construction of numerous wet and dry docks. Liverpool soon became a treasure house of precious cargoes from all over the world and the Pier Head landing stage is reputed to be the largest floating quay in the world.

Liverpool expanded significantly in the 19th century and a number of major buildings were constructed (St. George's Hall, Lime Street Station etc.). When the American Civil War broke out Liverpool became a hot bed of intrigue. The last confederate ship, the CSS Alabama, was built at Birkenhead on the Mersey and the CSS Shenandoah surrendered there. Liverpool was granted city status in 1880.

Liverpool's Town Hall was designed by John Wood of Bath. Later James Wyatt was responsible for enlarging the building by the addition of a Dome. Other notable buildings are the restored Museum and Walker Art Gallery. The old parish church of St. Nicholas was rebuilt in 1952, except for the tower of 1815. This church stands in a memorial garden facing pierhead.

Standing on the Pierhead for almost a century are the Three Graces. Rising to nearly 295ft is the Royal Liver Building which has two towers surmounted by the legendry Liver Birds, the Cunard Building and the Port of Liverpool Building. The idea for these three majestic buildings was conceived and they were constructed as visible symbols of Liverpool's international prestige. To-day, these three buildings define one of the worlds most recognizable skylines.

Sir Giles Gilbert-Scott designed the New Anglican Cathedral, it was begun in 1904, it has a wonderful organ and fine stained glass windows. In stark contrast is the new Roman Catholic Cathedral of Christ the King, with its impressive interior lanterntower of multi-coloured glass. This great modern-day Cathedral was consecrated in 1967.

During World War II there were eighty air-raids on Merseyside, with an especially concentrated series of raids in May 1941 which interrupted operations at the docks for almost a week. Although 'only' 2,500 people were killed, almost half the homes in the metropolitan area sustained some damage and 11,000 were totally destroyed. John Lennon, one of the founding members of The Beatles, was born in Liverpool during an air-raid on October 9, 1940.

Significant rebuilding followed the war, including massive housing estates and the Seaforth Dock, the largest dock project in Britain. However, the city has been suffering since the 1950s with the loss of numerous employers. By 1985 the population had fallen to 460,000. Declines in manufacturing and dock activity struck the city particularly hard.

Liverpool has a strong maritime history that goes back over 800 years and there is much that bears witness to this illustrious seafaring prowess to be seen in the town and the museums.
This enterprising City truly has something for everyone. If it is peace and quiet that you seek, then it is to be found in the wonderful countryside that lies just a stones throw from the city. If it is sea and sand then that too can be found close by. Exciting shops are all around and there are numerous pubs, inns and restaurants many of which are renowned for their international cuisine and some that offer delicious 'home-cooked' dishes, all though provide the visitor with a unique eating experience.

Home Page  ::   Attractions   ::  Events  ::  History  ::  The Beatles  ::  Gallery ::  Maps  ::  Advertise  ::  Contacts
Copyright 2014 © City Portal. All rights reserved.